Stress is Soaring During the Coronavirus Pandemic, So Are Divorce Rates

Tensions have been running high since the coronavirus pandemic swept the country earlier this year, and divorce rates in the United States have increased. In a recent survey by Legal Templates, 31% of couples say the quarantine has been damaging to their relationship. The company has also seen a 34% increase in sales of its divorce agreement template compared to this time last year.

For many couples, much of the conflict occurred early in the pandemic—survey results revealed that interest in separation was at its highest on April 13. Spending much more time at home with our loved ones can be tricky—especially when many people are also trying to work from home and care for children, too. Add in financial strain and a pandemic of unprecedented scale, and the soaring divorce rates make sense.

“It’s possible that divorces spiked as people entered what mental health and human service professionals refer to as the “disillusionment phase” of the Phases of Disaster— the time when optimism turns to discouragement, stress heightens, and negative reactions often occur,” Legal Templates commented in its survey results. 

The survey revealed a number of interesting trends—couples who got married within the past five years accounted for 58% of survey respondents who said they are pursuing a divorce during the coronavirus pandemic. Among this subset of people, this rate is 16% higher than it was last year. Meanwhile, 20% of users purchased a divorce agreement after being married for less than five months.

Another interesting finding from the survey is that couples in the South are purchasing divorce agreements at twice or even three-times the rate of couples in other geographical regions of the country.

It’s interesting to look at these findings and see how the pandemic is affecting us in many ways beyond the virus itself. A key takeaway here is that stress is much higher than usual for most people, and this impacts our lives in many ways, from our physical and mental health to our relationships with others. According to the Mayo Clinic, some common effects of stress include anxiety, headaches, muscle tension, chest pain, fatigue, change in sex drive, lack of motivation, feeling overwhelmed, feeling irritable or angry, and upset stomach. If any of those symptoms sound familiar, you’re not alone—especially these days.

If you would like to meet with a knowledgeable doctor, consider contacting Arizona OB/GYN Affiliates (AOA) at 602-343-6174 or visit www.aoafamily.com. We have offices in Phoenix, Ahwatukee, Casa Grande, Goodyear, Scottsdale, Gilbert, and Chandler.

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