Tips for Shifting Your Baby from Two Naps to One

Most people would agree that caring for little ones throughout the pandemic has been challenging and not at all what most of us are used to. While focusing so intently on how to keep your family safe, it’s easy to let other important things fall to the back burner of your mind, like sleep schedules. If you have a toddler at home, you may have been wondering when to shift them from two naps a day to one.

Napping

Most toddlers transition from two naps a day to one when they’re between one- and two-years-old. Around this time, they’ll probably start sleeping through the night more solidly than when they were an infant, and they may not need quite as much sleep during the day.

As you look to make the transition, keep an eye out for some clear signs that let you know it’s time: your toddler may start to resist naps or become moody when you put them down for a nap, they might take longer to drift off when you put them down for a nap, they might wake up early from their naps, or they might make it through the day just fine even when something gets in the way of their second nap.

That said, even if the signs are all clear, it can still be a tricky transition. Here are a few tips to keep in mind:

Every child is different.
Just because your child is a certain age doesn’t mean you need to phase them into a one-nap-a-day schedule. If your toddler doesn’t seem to be adjusting into a new napping schedule with ease, consider holding off for a month or so before trying again.

This transition will take time.
Switching to one nap a day most likely isn’t going to happen overnight. Some days may be a one-nap day and some days may be a two-nap day. One tip is to keep the transition gradual by pushing the morning nap a bit later each day until you can completely remove it and replace it with just one nap in the afternoon.

The afternoon nap may be longer than it used to be.
After removing the morning nap, your toddler may be extra tired by the time nap time rolls around. This means they will probably take a longer afternoon nap than you’re used to. Many people also shift the afternoon nap a bit earlier, such as right after lunch.

If you would like to meet with a knowledgeable doctor, consider contacting Arizona OB/GYN Affiliates (AOA) at 602-343-6174 or visit www.aoafamily.com. We have offices in Phoenix, Ahwatukee, Casa Grande, Goodyear, Scottsdale, Gilbert, and Chandler.

Date Night Ideas in the Time of Coronavirus

Times are a bit different these days and while you may not be comfortable having a baby-sitter in your home or dining at a local restaurant, this doesn’t mean you’re not in need of a date night. So, what exactly is one to do?

Date Night

Here are some ideas to consider:

Take a virtual cooking class together.
You can take a cooking class with a bit of help from YouTube, a cooking school, or an online cooking personality. Search around online for a virtual cooking class that looks like a good fit, make sure you have all the ingredients you need, and get cooking. This is a great way to “escape” without actually going anywhere—plus, you’ll have a delicious meal to eat when you’re finished.

Hold your own wine or beer tasting.
Just because you won’t be spending the afternoon at a local brewery or winery doesn’t mean you can’t bring the brewery or winery home to you. Order different varieties of beer or wine from a local retailer, pull out some flight glasses (any glasses will work as a substitute), and get tasting! Take your tasting up a notch by jotting down some notes—then you can compare styles and have an idea of what you like next time you’re looking to make a wine or beer purchase.

Bring your favorite restaurant home.
Throw on some of your finest clothes, buy a fancy bottle of wine, light some candles, and order takeout from a local restaurant you love.

Head to the spa without leaving the house.
At-home spa? Yes, please. Set up a home spa where you can give each other massages, do a foot soak together, and maybe even a little DIY face mask action. Search Google and Pinterest for some creative ideas.

Have a picnic.
Pull out that picnic blanket you’ve been itching to use for months, compile a dazzling spread of snacks, get your favorite beverages ready, and settle down in the backyard or on the living room floor for a picnic.

Plan a trip.
Grab your favorite drinks from the fridge and let the adventure wheels spin as you plan a trip or two you’d love to set out on once coronavirus restrictions lift. Take notes so you can think about putting those plans into action when we’re able to travel again.

We hope you’ll have fun with these date night ideas—we love to see you healthy and happy in your relationship.

If you would like to meet with a knowledgeable doctor, consider contacting Arizona OB/GYN Affiliates (AOA) at 602-343-6174 or visit www.aoafamily.com. We have offices in Phoenix, Ahwatukee, Casa Grande, Goodyear, Scottsdale, Gilbert, and Chandler.

IUDs After Birth: Here’s What You Need to Know

If you’re considering birth control options after giving birth, an intrauterine device, more commonly known as an IUD, is a great option to consider. IUDs are safe to use while breastfeeding, and you don’t need to remember to take a pill at the same time each day as is required with a birth control pill—something many busy and tired new moms will appreciate. Here’s everything you need to know about IUDs as you consider your options.

IUD

What is an IUD?
An IUD is a small device (about the size of a quarter or a bit larger) shaped like a “T” that gets inserted into your uterus in a process that usually takes less than five minutes. You can typically have one put in right after you give birth, or you can have it inserted later at a postpartum appointment.

IUDs come in two varieties—hormonal and copper. A hormonal IUD prevents pregnancy by preventing your ovaries from releasing eggs and by thickening the mucus in your cervical canal so that sperm can’t get through to fertilize an egg. A copper IUD, on the other hand, is wrapped in copper wire that’s toxic to sperm, which prevents sperm from fertilizing the egg.

No matter which variety you choose, IUDs are one of the most effective forms of birth control out there, with an efficacy rate of more than 99%. Put simply, this means you’ll have a less than 1% chance of getting pregnant while using an IUD.

How long does an IUD last?
An IUD isn’t permanent, but it can stay in your body for years without any maintenance required. Some types are effective for up to ten years. If you decide you want to get pregnant again, a healthcare professional can remove the IUD for you and you’ll be able to get pregnant soon after, often right away.

Are there any side effects?
Most people experience a bit of cramping or pain as the IUD is inserted and even into the days or weeks afterwards. For some people, cramps, spotting, and irregular periods may be present for the first three to six months after insertion. With a copper IUD, you may also experience heavier or longer periods and increased cramping during your period. And with a hormonal IUD, you may notice symptoms similar to those present with other forms of hormonal birth control, like headaches and sore breasts—but often these don’t linger beyond the first few months.

In some cases, an IUD may not be a good idea.
IUDs aren’t recommended if you’re pregnant, have certain types of cancer including cervical and uterine, are experiencing vaginal bleeding, had a pelvic infection recently, or if you have an STD. It’s also important to keep in mind that while IUDs are an effective way of preventing pregnancy, they don’t protect you from STDs.

If you would like to meet with a knowledgeable doctor, consider contacting Arizona OB/GYN Affiliates (AOA) at 602-343-6174 or visit www.aoafamily.com. We have offices in Phoenix, Ahwatukee, Casa Grande, Goodyear, Scottsdale, Gilbert, and Chandler.