10 Reasons Behind Female Pelvic Pain

Have you been experiencing sharp or nagging pelvic pain to the point where you’re starting to wonder what’s going on? Pelvic pain, occurring in the lower abdomen below the belly button, presents in many different ways and can be sharp, dull, aching, sudden, or recurrent.

Female Pelvic Pain

This pain can have many different causes, some of which are far more serious than others. If you have any concerns about pelvic pain, it’s important to see your healthcare provider.

Here are some of the most common reasons for female pelvic pain:

Endometriosis
Endometriosis is a condition where tissue that’s similar to the uterine lining grows outside the uterus. It’s most common in women who are in their thirties and forties, and may affect more than 10 percent of women between the ages of 15 and 44, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health. This condition can be very uncomfortable and contribute to chronic pelvic pain.

Menstrual Cramps
Menstrual cramps are a common cause of pelvic pain, especially in the few days leading up to or during your menstrual period. While these cramps are fairly common, it’s a good idea to speak with your physician if they’re extremely painful or interfering with your quality of life.

Ovulation
Many women experience temporary pelvic pain when they ovulate each month. This happens during the middle of your menstrual cycle and the pain is usually localized to one side of your pelvis. The pain may last anywhere between a few minutes and a few hours, but doesn’t require treatment.

Ovarian Cysts
An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac that forms on the ovary. Many ovarian cysts don’t cause any pain, but if the cyst becomes twisted or bursts, this condition can lead to a great deal of pelvic pain. If you experience sudden or severe pelvic pain, it’s important to see your doctor.

Uterine Fibroids
Uterine fibroids are non-cancerous tumors that form on the wall of the uterus. Like ovarian cysts, these are typically not painful, but can cause pelvic pain if they twist or are disrupted.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (also commonly referred to as IBS) is a chronic gastrointestinal condition that affects the large intestine. Researchers aren’t entirely sure what causes IBS, but its symptoms can be triggered by stress, food, and hormones, and the condition often leads to pelvic and abdominal pain.

Constipation
If your bowel movements become less regular and you have trouble passing stools, you may be suffering from constipation, which is another common cause of pelvic pain. Constipation frequently arises due to dietary changes, medication, irritable bowel syndrome, and more. If you’re experiencing any pain with your bowel movements, it’s important to see a doctor.

Sexually Transmitted Infections
Some sexually transmitted infections, such as gonorrhea and chlamydia, can contribute to pelvic pain. Additionally, some sexually transmitted infections that are left untreated can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, which is another cause of pelvic pain.

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
Pelvic inflammatory disease is a condition involving infection of the female reproductive organs (ovaries, cervix, fallopian tubes, and uterus). It often arises due to untreated sexually transmitted infections, but you can also get it for other reasons, such as having sex with more than one partner, or having sex with a partner who has other sex partners besides you. This condition is one of the leading causes of preventable infertility.

Ectopic Pregnancy
An ectopic pregnancy is a serious medical condition where a fertilized egg attaches to the cervix, abdominal cavity, or fallopian tube rather than the uterus. Women who are experiencing an ectopic pregnancy may experience nausea, pelvic and abdominal pain, dizziness, rectal pressure, and other symptoms. This condition can be very dangerous to your health, so It’s important to see a doctor right away if you think you may have an ectopic pregnancy.

If you would like to meet with a knowledgeable doctor, consider contacting Arizona OB/GYN Affiliates (AOA) at 602-343-6174 or visit www.aoafamily.com. We have offices in Phoenix, Ahwatukee, Casa Grande, Goodyear, Scottsdale, Gilbert, and Chandler.

Two Menstrual Periods in One Month

Getting your period twice in one month can be surprising, not to mention annoying and uncomfortable. And if you’ve never experienced this before, you also might find yourself worried that something concerning is going on in your body.

Two Periods in One Month

Getting two periods in one month isn’t always a cause for concern—your body may be following its normal menstrual cycle, which can range in length between 24 and 38 days. So, if your cycle is less than a month long and you have your period at the beginning of the month, you may see it appear again toward the end of the month.

But aside from the length of your cycle, there are many other reasons why you might experience bleeding twice in a month. In some cases, you may be experiencing bleeding tied to a health condition rather than actually getting your period twice. Here are some of the common causes:

You’re pregnant
Irregular bleeding during pregnancy occurs for some women, and it’s possible to mistake irregular bleeding for your period. If you get your period twice in one month and are sexually active, you may want to take a pregnancy test to see if you’re experiencing irregular bleeding as a result of being pregnant.

You have pelvic inflammatory disease
Pelvic inflammatory disease is a condition in which the female reproductive organs get infected after bacteria move into that area of the body from the vagina or cervix. One of the symptoms  of pelvic inflammatory disease is irregular uterine bleeding, in which you may experience bleeding between menstrual cycles.

You’re experiencing a thyroid disorder
Both hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid gland) and hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid gland) can cause your menstrual cycle to become shorter, meaning you may have two periods within one month. Both conditions can be diagnosed with a blood test and treated with medication.

You have uterine fibroids
Uterine fibroids are abnormal growths that develop in the uterus. They’re typically benign but may contribute to heavy bleeding between periods. If you mistake this bleeding for your menstrual cycle, it might appear as though you have two menstrual periods in one month.

You didn’t take your birth control on schedule
Forgetting to take your birth control on schedule can throw your hormones out of whack in a way that may lead you to experience irregular bleeding. Your cycle will typically return to normal after you resume taking your birth control medication according to schedule.

You’re under a lot of stress
Feeling really stressed recently? This could be the reason why your period came twice in a month, as stress can shorten your menstrual cycle. Stress can lead you to miss your period as well.

You have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal condition in which your reproductive hormones become imbalanced. Irregular bleeding is a common symptom of this condition.

Getting your period twice in one month usually isn’t anything to worry about if it happens just once or you know you have a shorter cycle. But if this is happening repeatedly each month and is different from your normal cycle, you’ll want to see your healthcare provider to find out what’s going on.

If you would like to meet with a knowledgeable doctor, consider contacting Arizona OB/GYN Affiliates (AOA) at 602-343-6174 or visit www.aoafamily.com. We have offices in Phoenix, Ahwatukee, Casa Grande, Goodyear, Scottsdale, Gilbert, and Chandler.

What Happens When a Women Gets Wet?

Ever wonder why you get wet when you’re feeling aroused? Or maybe you’re curious why you sometimes notice a feeling of wetness during the normal course of your day-to-day life? The first thing to know is that while some people naturally produce more vaginal lubrication than others, this wetness is completely normal in most scenarios, especially when it’s not accompanied by any other signs or symptoms that seem out of the ordinary.

Vaginal Wetness

Vaginal wetness is common when you’re feeling aroused, but what you may not have realized is that it’s also present when you’re not aroused. It’s actually normal to produce somewhere between one and four milliliters of vaginal fluid every day. The exact amount of fluid you produce each day will vary. This wetness helps keep your vagina clean and also provides lubrication to protect against tearing and injury. Here’s what else you need to know:

What is vaginal wetness?
Most vaginal fluid is made primarily of water, along with some salts like phosphate and sodium chloride, organic compounds such as lipids and amino acids, antibodies that help the body reduce risk of infections, and old cells from the lining of the vagina, uterus, and cervix.

A thin layer of vaginal fluid typically lines the walls of your vagina and is important for a number of reasons—it provides lubrication that makes sex more comfortable, can minimize or prevent vaginal pain, and even supports fertility. Many different factors can contribute to vaginal wetness, including your age, hormone levels, medications, stress, level of arousal, infections, and perspiration. Here’s more information on how some of these factors contribute to vaginal wetness:

Arousal
As you become aroused, blood flow to your genitals increases, which triggers the release of fluid from the cervix and the Bartholin’s glands, which provides lubrication during sexual activity. Often, the more aroused you’re feeling, the more vaginal lubrication your body will produce.

Hormones and age
Hormones play a big role in vaginal wetness. Higher estrogen levels lead to increased vaginal wetness, but as your body starts to produce less estrogen during menopause and afterwards, your body may not produce as much vaginal fluid, making your vagina drier.

Meanwhile, as you move through your menstrual cycle and ovulation approaches, your cervix produces more vaginal fluid, which plays an important role in helping sperm travel to an egg during the process of fertilization.

Infection
Sometimes you will feel more wet than usual if you have an infection such as bacterial vaginosis. The vaginal fluid helps to remove bacteria from the vaginal canal. Infections may also lead you to produce other types of vaginal discharge, which will vary in appearance depending on the type of infection. But if you notice any discharge that’s an abnormal color or smell, you’ll want to get in touch with your physician.

Medication
Hormonal birth control can alter your vaginal fluid production, leaving you more wet or dry than you’re used to when not taking the medication.

How do I know if I need to see a doctor?
Vaginal wetness is perfectly normal. In fact, in many cases, it’s a sign that your vagina is healthy. But there are a few signs and symptoms that let you know a trip to the doctor may be in order. Here are a few:

  • You have vaginal discharge that smells bad or appears different than what you’re used to.
  • You’re experiencing burning, itching, sensitivity, and/or pain in the vaginal area.
  • Your vaginal area is swollen.
  • You’ve been experiencing vaginal dryness.
  • You’ve started taking a new medication and have noticed that you’re more or less wet than usual.

If you would like to meet with a knowledgeable doctor, consider contacting Arizona OB/GYN Affiliates (AOA) at 602-343-6174 or visit www.aoafamily.com. We have offices in Phoenix, Ahwatukee, Casa Grande, Goodyear, Scottsdale, Gilbert, and Chandler.